[email protected]: Stanford explores the futurism of a centuries-old novel

From artificial intelligence to biomedical technology, the Mary Shelley classic exhibits a remarkable relevance (Illustration by Andrew Strawder) Somewhere amid the news of Facebook’s very dystopian sci-fi-sounding artificial intelligence incident this past July, it was easy enough to think of the simple but critical line delivered by Jeff Goldblum’s character in the original Jurassic Park film — “your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if ...

Read More

“An island of sobriety”: getting to the bottom of Palo Alto’s non-alcoholic history

On Leland Stanford’s orders, PA was dry for a really, really long time. Oh man…if Leland knew: Stanford students drinking up (presumably on a remote section of campus) in 1938. (Courtesy of the Stanford Photo Archive) A few months back I was chatting with my father-in-law, who grew up in Palo Alto back in the 1950s. It’s funny talking with him about the area back then, because he doesn’t so much tell me stories ...

Read More

Reimagining the way we ask our kids, “How was your day?”

Stanford grads disrupt the children’s book formula with Goodnight News By Eva Glasrud When it comes to parenting, it can be the simple things that are most challenging, such as the basic “How was your day?” question being answered with an abrupt-sounding one-word answer. In ways that are both predictable and cliche, many parents regard a short response as a sign of growing distance or a candid indication that their child simply doesn’t ...

Read More

Stanford vs. Cal: A visual history of the Big Game

The triumph and the tragedy…the Play and the Revenge of the Play…the Rugby Years? A photographic historical tour of the Bay Area’s most heated football tradition By Charles Russo Dating back to the 1890s, the Big Game — the annual Stanford-Berkeley showdown — is the oldest sports rivalry in the West. (Courtesy of the Stanford Historical Photograph Collection) This weekend will see the 122nd incarnation of The Big Game, one of the oldest, most well-known and contentious rivalries ...

Read More

From serendipity to Sinatra: the queen of Bay Area broadcasting reflects on her early days

Belva Davis and her half-century of blazing trails By Charles Russo A perennial personality of Bay Area tv news, Davis’s journalism career spans six decades. (Photo by Charles Russo) “An accident of fate.” That’s how Belva Davis characterizes for me her initial entryway into a long, distinguished career as one of the most storied broadcast journalists of the past half-century. I’m somewhat surprised to hear “accident” as a component of that equation, but I assume that Davis — even in retirement — simply ...

Read More

Pondering the Zen aesthetics of Stanford athletics

The new Home of Champions is not a museum, it’s a paradigm By Charles Russo Stanford’s new Home of Champions celebrates their most recent national titles in a marquee location by the front entrance. (Photo by Charles Russo) This past week I exited Stanford’s Home of Champions feeling inclined to quote the Hagakure. Yes, you read that correctly, but I’ll reiterate: the collective poise and purpose of the University’s new shrine to its athletics legacy left ...

Read More

The fittest man in Silicon Valley wants you to try the pesto pizza

Triathlete (and coffee entrepreneur) Max Fennell chats Peninsula lifestyle in-between workouts and hustle groups By Charles Russo California Dreaming: Max Fennell talks local lifestyle on the Peninsula. (Photo courtesy of Max Fennell) Menlo Park resident Max Fennell is on the move, and in more ways than one. As metaphors about triathletes go, that’s a bit of a gimme, but Max makes it work in ways that go above and beyond. At 29, he was recently the subject of ...

Read More

The Time Lapse: Stanford Class of ‘17

A centennial glimpse back for millennials going forward by Charles Russo The gentlemen of Phi Kappa Psi, circa 1917. (Courtesy of the Stanford Historical Photograph Collection) The 2017 school year begins today at Stanford University, and The Six Fifty sees it as an opportune launching point for our new visual history column — The Time Lapse, which will showcase a wide range of historical photography from many areas and eras of the Peninsula over the years. For this first ...

Read More

The Impossible Burger explained: Peninsula chefs on cooking Silicon Valley’s most controversial…

The Impossible Burger explained: Peninsula chefs on cooking Silicon Valley’s most controversial food By Elena Kadvany Vina Enoteca owner Rocco Scordella grew up on an olive farm in Bologna, Italy, in a region known for its meat culture. It seems almost sacrilegious that in 2017, he might serve a scientifically engineered hamburger made from plant-based ingredients at his Italian restaurant in Palo Alto. Vina Enoteca leaped into the fray in March, serving the Valley’s first ...

Read More

My own private Peninsula: permit-only hikes in the Santa Cruz Mountains

You know those people who always come back from fabulous vacations bragging about how they “had the whole place” to themselves? Next time, summon a smirk of your own and direct them to your Instagram feed, where they’ll see you cavorting in a beautiful park right here at home with NO CROWDS AT ALL, because you got a permit or arranged a special tour to get there. “We could have ...

Read More